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7 Tips to Charging Your Electric Vehicle in Singapore

Electric vehicles (EVs) are the way of the future, and they’re already paving that way right now on Singapore roads. While EV drivers are still but a handful, the community is definitely growing, as is the infrastructure for EV charging in Singapore.

If you’ve recently jumped onto the bandwagon and are now cruising around in a more eco-friendly electric vehicle, or if you’re thinking about making the switch sooner rather than later, then you’ll want to know everything about charging your EV at home and on the road.

In this ultimate guide to everything related to charging your EV in Singapore, we share the best app to find charging stations, the lowdown on AC vs DC charging, EV charging etiquette, and even a list of all the fastest EV chargers in Singapore for when you need a quick power up!

 

1. Stay Up to Date on EV Charging Stations Across Singapore

PlugShare is noted as the best free community app platform for all EV drivers. Its detailed map shows all the EV charging stations in Singapore, noting the different charging and plug types available at each location. (Note, though, that the search filters aren’t always accurate.) You can also see reviews from other drivers which can be incredibly useful, such as if a particular EV charger isn’t working, or if the charging output is lower than expected.

If you sign up for PlugShare, you can add your vehicle and automatically see only compatible chargers, saving you time in checking each location individually; plan charging stations along your desired route; and receive alerts when new charging stations open up near you.

To date, there are an estimated 3,800 EV charging points across 250 charging locations in Singapore, but the infrastructure is quickly evolving.

Budget 2021 announced an allocation of $30 million towards building up the EV charging infrastructure in Singapore. The government aims to install 60,000 EV charging points across the country by 2030, with housing estate car parks required to support EV charging for 15% of their lots. In fact, we should be seeing at least 12,000 charging points in HDB car parks by the end of 2025. So it’s only a matter of time that charging your EV will become even easier and more accessible.


2. Understand the Dynamics of EV Charging

The batteries in electric vehicles are essentially like super-sized versions of the battery in your smartphone; all you have to do is plug it in to charge it. But most electric vehicles can be charged with both AC and DC — which to use, and when?
 

  • What’s the difference between AC and DC charging?

AC (alternating current) charging usually happens at lower power levels and is more suitable for overnight charging while you sleep, or charging while you’re at work if there is a charging point near your office.

DC (direct current) charging is used for rapid charging and can usually be found at more accessible public charging stations for a fast charge.

You’ll find that most charging points at MSCP (multi-storey car parks) in residential areas or installed in condominiums feature slower AC charging, whereas quick DC charging can be found alongside AC charging stations in the carparks of shopping malls, places of interest, and commercial buildings.
 

  • What kind of plugs are compatible at the charging stations in Singapore?

The most common two you’ll find are IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) Type 2 for AC charging, and CCS (Combined Charging System) for DC charging. It’s good to note that some only offer Type 2. There are a handful of charging stations that specifically cater to CHAdeMO and SAE J1772 plugs, but you’ll have to check this out on the PlugShare app, as they are not so commonly found. Tesla uses its own proprietary plug.
 

  • How do I know which type of charging is best for my EV?

Always refer to your specific EV model’s manual and guidelines for the best practices regarding charging and maintenance. Following these tips can help optimise your charging and promote the longevity of your EV’s battery. When in doubt, always check with your car dealership.

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Always check which type of EV charging is compatible with your electric car
 

  • When should I charge my EV?

Try not to let your EV battery drain too low. Allowing an EV battery to discharge to extremely low levels can strain the cells and affect its overall capacity, which you don’t want, especially when it’s the main thing that powers your electric car!

To prevent deep discharges, aim to recharge your EV when it drops to around a 30% battery level. Many EVs these days will alert you of when to charge in order to maintain a healthy charge level and extend your battery’s lifespan. Besides, you don’t want to find yourself in the middle of the road, unable to move, because your battery is completely dead!


3. Note the Popular EV Charging Providers 

Different operators manage their own networks of charging stations across the island. Some of the most popular ones are:

Because each network features their own app for EV charging, you may have to download all the different apps, so make sure you have enough space on your phone to do this. The apps feature real time updates on your electric car’s charging status.

The in-app prices are going to be the most accurate way to find out how much charging will cost at a particular station, as prices (usually calculated per kW, for kilowatt) differ for each provider.

Make sure that you enable the push notifications for all the EV charging apps so that you don’t miss being notified when your electric car is fully charged.

Note: Some providers charge idle fees which are charged for every minute your fully-charged car is still parked in a charging lot after the grace period allocated.


4. Keep Your Eyes Peeled for EV Charging Promotions

To incentivise people to charge with their network, charging operators may offer special promotions, especially during festive periods. Enabling app notifications will alert you to these special promotions.

Some current promotions include:


5. Respect EV Charging Etiquette

No matter how many new charge points sprout up on the island, EV charging in Singapore will continue to be much of a shared activity among the EV driving community.

To make things more pleasant for all EV drivers, certain rules of etiquette should be respected regarding EV charging, both in public spaces and residential locations.

  • Pick a charging station that is suitable for your car. A car with a maximum DC fast charge rate of 50kW will not charge faster when plugged into a 120kW charging station, and will instead take up a spot that a car with a faster-charging capability could use.
     
  • Don’t just plug it in and assume it’s working. You may want to hang around for a minute or two to check that your EV is correctly plugged in and actively charging first before walking away, so you don’t end up wasting your (and others’) time.
     
  • While there is no risk of overcharging your EV, the courteous thing to do is once you see on the app that your car is charged, to move it to another non-charging lot so that someone else has the opportunity to charge their EV as well. (Note: As mentioned, some network providers charge idle fees to deter inconsiderate EV charging behaviour.)
     
  • 80% is usually considered a full charge because the speed of charging tapers off after that, meaning it will take a much longer time to slowly climb towards 100%. It would be good etiquette to charge your EV only up to 80% and then let others use the charging station.

 

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Try to be considerate of other EV drivers and move your electric car once it’s charged
 

  • If you encounter a faulty charger, put the effort into notifying the network provider, as well as adding a tip on the PlugShare community. When you put in such effort, others will do the same, and everyone in the EV community benefits.
     
  • The average EV needs to be charged about once every five days. Try not to be kiasu and hog the charging stations where you live every single night, so that others can also have a chance. Despite the increasing number of charging stations being installed islandwide, the ratio of charging points to electric vehicles will be around 5:1, which means you should get used to a schedule of charging your EV once every five days. Charging daily may also cause battery degradation.
     
  • Why not put a note on the other electric vehicles in your car park with your email, and set up a neighbourhood WhatsApp group so you can arrange with each other who gets to charge when? It’s a lot easier than having to “fight” over a charging station, and you get to make friends with fellow EV enthusiasts as well.


6. Set Up an EV Charging Routine

Setting up a routine helps to incorporate charging into your daily life and reduces the risk of surprises. Here are some tips to establish a good EV charging routine:

  • Look into where the nearest charging stations are from your home or workplace. (Note: If you live in a condominium or private apartment, talk to your management about introducing EV charging stations if there are currently none. With the government grants supporting EV charging installations also in private residences, it may be possible to see this happen if there is enough demand for it, so make sure you make your need heard.)
     
  • Always have a few nearby backup charging stations on hand just in case your usual station is full.
     
  • Observe (in person or on the apps) when the charging stations are most underutilised and see if you can arrange your schedule to suit it, especially if you have a job that allows such flexibility.
     
  • Plan quick charges around certain errands or activities such as dropping by the post office, doing your groceries, or window shopping on the weekend.


7. Note the Best Places for Super Fast EV Charging

Even after establishing a good charging routine, you might sometimes require a quick boost on the go.

Homegrown mobile charging service P.Up (Power Up Tech), set up by three local automotive engineers, is the first of its kind in Singapore. If your EV battery level is dangerously low and you need an emergency top-up, all you have to do is schedule a visit from “Puppy” via their app, and they’ll literally pull up right next to you and charge your EV so that it’s ready to go within just one hour. You can even add on hand wash, tire shine or vacuum services!

 

We’ve also noted all the fastest EV chargers around Singapore, so that you can easily refer to this list at a glance for a quick top-up for your EV, wherever you are!
 

Fastest EV Chargers Around Singapore (DC charging)

 

EAST

Max Charge (DC)

Location

Provider

200kW

Trion Building Kallang

SP

180kW

Shell Pasir Ris

Shell

120kW

Changi Business Park

Charge+

Changi City Point

Charge+

Esso East Coast

Other

Our Tampines Hub

CDGE

Shell Changi

Shell

Shell Geylang

Shell

Shell McPherson

Shell

Singapore Expo Carpark A

Other

100kW

Caltex Changi

SP

Changi Airport Terminal 2

Juice+

Paya Lebar Square

SP

Shell Tampines

Shell

Temasek Polytechnic (Engineering School)

SP

White Sands

SP

 

CENTRAL

Max Charge (DC)

Location

Provider

180kW

39A Jln Pemimpin

EVone

120kW

AMK Autopoint

Charge+

Axxel Innovation Centre

Charge+

CT Hub 2

Charge+

Gain City AMK

Juice+

Hong Leong Building

Charge+

Hougang Mall

Charge+

Mah Building

Charge+

OCBC Centre

Charge+

Orchard Gateway

Charge+

Sin Ming Autocity

CDGE

Suntec City

Shell

UE Square Office Tower

Charge+

100kW

Centrepoint

SP

City Square Mall

SP

Fortune Centre

SP

Luzerne Bendemeer

Charge+

One@Redhill Centre

Juice+

Raffles City

Other

Rochester Commons

SP

Sin Ming Autocare

CDGE

Wedge Mount Industrial Building

Juice+

WEST

Max Charge (DC)

Location

Provider

180kW

Enterprise Hub

EVone

150kW

SPC Bukit Batok

SP

120kW

Bukit Batok Connection

Shell

Lam Soon Industrial Building

Charge+

Ngee Ann Polytechnic

Other

Penjuru Close

EVone

Pioneer Centre

Other

Storhub Jurong East

EVone

5B Toh Guan Road East

Shell

100kW

JTC Summit

SP

 

 

NORTH

Max Charge (DC)

Location

Provider

120kW

Bukit Panjang Plaza

SP

Gain City Sungei Kadut

Juice+

Koufu HQ

CDGE

Mega@Woodland

Juice+

Northpoint City

Charge+

Storhub Marsiling

EVone

Waterway Point

Charge+

100kW

Gain City Sungei Kadut

SP

Marina Country Club

Juice+

Oasis Terraces Punggol

SP

Note, this is just a reference guide. Changes are to be expected.
 

Congratulations! You now know almost everything there is to know about EV charging in Singapore.

Just one more thing that’s very important to know! Did you know that DirectAsia’s car insurance covers (select) electric vehicles as well? Some perks include coverage for any damage caused by your vehicle to a charging station, a Lifetime Repair Guarantee on EV parts damaged in an accident and repaired at our approved partner workshops, and the option to add on 24 Hour Breakdown Assistance. For more information, visit this EV insurance coverage FAQ.

To all electric vehicle drivers out there, a big thank you from us at DirectAsia for doing your part for our environment!